Future Representation Week 1- 3D Scanning

In this tutorial we were introduced to 3D scanning and point cloud surveys. In the first half of the session we were shown how to set up and use the 3D scanner in the gallery space and in the second half we imported the information and convert it the information for various uses with different software.

3D Scan of last years end of year show.
3D Scan of last years end of year show.

 

We went up to the gallery space on the ground floor and set up the scanner on its tripod. We were then shown how to level the scanner and use its basic functions to get it started. We took 2 scans of the same area from 2 different locations.

3D Scanner
3D Scanner

The more scans you take of an area the more accurate the finished product will be. It looks for similarities in areas so it can stitch it together. The alternative to this is putting points round the room that the the scanner will recognise.

However the scanner does not recognise transparent surfaces so you will always see an image of the surface beyond elements such as windows.

Survey Point
Survey Point

Once the scan was complete we headed back to the workshop to upload the information to it could be converted to work with different software.

Unfortunately we could not upload the information so had to use a previous example scan which is shown in the PDF.

The information is imported using software called Faro Scene. The scans are imported as individual items and the upload time will depend on the number and quality of each scan.

If more than one scan has been taken of the same area you will need to stitch them together which can be done in Faro Scene. Once this complete you will see a stitched lo res version of your whole 3D scan.

Scan Preview.
Scan Preview.

You can clip the box and remove any unwanted survey data before you can export to create a usable mesh to manipulate in other software.

First of all you crate mesh by using the Create Mesh dialogue box in Faro. The target value is set to give as many triangles as possible. this joins up the points, the more triangles the smoother the surface. The file is then exported as a obj file and imported into Rhino. An OBJ file can be imported into most CAD software.

The project can then be rendered with the photographic information from the model. Once imported into Rhino the mesh can be manipulated and rendered.

Overall i enjoyed the 3D scanning element of the course and can see how it how it would be very useful, especially with refurbishing existing buildings,  but i do not feel like it interested me enough to explore it further for Future Representation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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